Canning, Fermenting, Food

Fermentation Fridays

Welcome to Fermentation Fridays.  I’ve decided I have gotten so into making fermented things that I want to make this a regular Friday post for the foreseeable future.  Not to mention there seems to be some interest in it, especially after my last post.  So, you can join me in the fermenting process not to mention enjoy watching the successes and failures as I learn.

Sauerkraut

It’s not everyones favorite way to eat cabbage.  I know it took me sometime to enjoy sauerkraut after years of my West Texas German Grandmothers cooking.  I won’t go into detail but it’s been a decade and I can finally enjoy purple cabbage. In honor of the German side of my family, I’d like to introduce to you: The Zesty German.

Before getting started, I highly recommend having some sort of Fermentation Crock on hand.  Whether you buy one, this is the one I have, make one which you can find plenty of videos on YouTube, or use multiple 32 ounce Mason Jars with the Ziplock-bag method.

The Zesty German

This is not for the faint of heart.  There is enough garlic in this recipe to cure whatever ails you. If you’re scared of garlic or have a first date anytime within a week, you can definitely cut back on the garlic.

  • 5-6 pounds of green cabbage
  • 3 tablespoons salt
  • 7 cloves of garlic
  • 1 TBSP caraway seeds
  • 1 TBSP red pepper chili flakes

*Important: make sure that everything is as clean as possible from the vegetables to utensils and containers*

  1. Slice cabbage in thin chunks.  How you prefer your sauerkraut is up to you. If you like it in a small diced format or perhaps long and thin strips (which is how I like mine).
  2. In small batches, mix salt and cabbage and let salt begin to draw the water out of the cabbage and transfer to the fermentation crock. Then continue to massage and mix the salt/cabbage. Juices will begin to release.
  3. If you have whey from your previous sauerkraut mixture, go ahead and add a tablespoon.  If you don’t… don’t worry!
  4. Mix in smashed/minced garlic, caraway seeds, and chili flakes making sure to massage all items together.
  5. Use weight to make sure the cabbage mix is condensed and covered fully by liquid.
  6. Cover your container and set in a cool, dark place for 7-14 days.  (I always go with ten).

Note:  If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

Canning, Food, Uncategorized

Pump Up the Jams!

Oh, how I love a good food pun.

Yes, PUMP up the jams!  Last weekend at the ABGB Austin Flea Market, I had a record breaking sales weekend, outside of the holiday season.  This week, I am a jam making fool!  I cannot believe that I am wiped out of stock.

Now, I would have been standing over the stove sooner, but I certainly didn’t foresee blowing out my back, which had me laid up for a few days.  Still a little tender, I got to it this weekend!

I’m kicking off the fall with blackberry rosemary jam.  This one is slowly becoming a silent favorite amongst regulars. It’s got the sweetness from the fruit (obviously), I leave the seeds in for a little bit of tooth and texture, the rosemary adds a touch of savory and is quite aromatic.  I’ve heard folks tell me they put it on an english muffin with butter, others use it as a last minute touch on grilled pork chops, etc.  I, myself, love it with brie! Whether it’s on grilled cheese or a condiment on a burger with arugula and more brie, of course.

Check out the upcoming craft fair schedule over the coming weeks to pick up some Blackberry Rosemary Jam to add to your cupboard.

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Canning, Uncategorized

Cool as a Cuke

It’s Summer.  It’s hot and some of my favorite vegetables are in season: okra, shishito peppers, and tomatoes.  Watermelon (yes, I realize this is a fruit) and cucumbers are runners up and with cucumbers means PICKLES!

I’ve been waiting since January, when I finished my last jar of bread and butter pickles, for cucumbers to make their come back.  I made sure to get some at the HOPE Farmer’s Market from Johnson’s Backyard Garden this weekend.

I spent Sunday afternoon slicing, packing, and brining these crisp cucumbers.  I still use the recipe Grandmother, Nettie, gave me.  It’s still on the same piece of paper she typed it up on her typewriter eight years ago.  My Grandmother passed away a few years ago and my family is delighted that her recipe was passed on.

That being said…

Austinites! I will be selling these pints of pickles at the HOPE Farmer’s Market this Sunday.  Swing by and get you some!  They’re just like Nettie used to make!

 

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